Styling for sale


Isn't it interesting to see how different we present homes for sale. Different countries seems to prefer different styles. Here in Sweden homestyling (really homestaging) has become a decorating style in itself. At least on Hemnet, which is an online service for homes for sale in Sweden. As a interior design teacher, I tell my students to stay away from Hemnet. Far away! Because it is quite scary to see how many homes looks almost identical! The same Tolix chairs, the same framed sentences on the walls, the same trows and pillow arrangements in bedrooms and livingrooms, the same candle holders on the tables. I have no explanation for this, other that the "styling" is made by a copycat, with little or no imagination or creativity. 

What's the situation in your country? 

Here is a Spanish example that I really like. Primarily because the styling is so un-Swedish, and because of the beautiful mix of old and new. 


Hur trött på hemnetstylingarna är du? På en skala? 
Hur skulle du vilja ha ditt hem presenterat om du skulle sälja? 
Jag som har mitt kontor och min ateljé "hemma", skulle få ett drygt jobb
att fixa huset inför en försäljning. Och jag vet vilka stylingtrender jag skulle vägra. 
Inte en pläd draperad på snedden kommer över min tröskel. 
Inte heller Tolixstolar, eller en Kubus. Eller inramade sentenser. 
Inga värmeljus på soffbordet eller tulpaner på köksbordet. 
Inga....., ja listan kan göras lång.Vad ogillar du mest, när du surfar på Hemnet? 




These pictures are from Los Penascales in Spain, by architects ÁBATON. The project was awarded the 2008 Asprima-Sima Prize for best private housing development in Spain. Read more here 

WABI SABI Lisbeth Williams @ Williams Design
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12 comments:

  1. the Spanish red Sofa is awesome!
    it was interesting "to look a little bit inside".
    have a lovely week, Lisbeth!

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  2. Hi there. This is really interesting. I used to have a home staging business in the United States. If you know Pottery Barn, think Pottery Barn. (no barns in sight!) Or, go to www.StagedHomes.com and see some examples. Thanks for sharing.

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    1. Hi Wanda, thanks for info and link. Homestaging is fun, and some 5+ years ago I wrote a book about it in Swedish. I did my homework then, learned from others (including Barb Schwartz work) to compare and develop strategies for a Swedish version of Homestaging. It was also THEN I realized it must be called Staging and not Styling. Not just because you create a STAGE for people to vision their new lives, but also because it tells everyone (including the sellers) that you are showing a house/apartment that is in a STAGE in between two owners, two families, two private lives. Thanks again, Lisbeth

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  3. jo ..men som här i göteborg är det ju samma möbler som åker runt med stylistena till varje ny lägenhet..*skrattar....man kan ju numera se vilken person som jobbat just vid det tillfället...galet ...men det säljer !

    Kram

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  4. Hello Lisbeth,

    You are sooooo right. Everything looks the same. It seems people do not want to take the time any more to create their own style. I can see this in fashion, too. I live in Canada and travel regularly to Europe for some freelance work and I can see this phenomenon in both 'worlds'. I am grateful for such people as Christiane Lemieux with her book 'UNDECORATE' and for magazines in Europe like VT WONEN and COUCH which show different styling !!
    I enjoy reading your blog and wish you all the best !! Keep up the good work.
    Susanne

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    1. Hi Susanne, agree with you. Too!

      I bought Christiane Lemieux's book 'UNDECORATE' last year. Who can resist such a great title? And VT Wonen is always a good read. Have to check out Couch. Think I've seen it, but will check it out again. Thanks! /Lisbeth

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  5. Here in South Africa it is much the same. A style is fashionable and everyone follows suit but there are those people who set their own trends and stamp their own personality on their homes.

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    1. Interesting. Seems like it is the same all over the world!

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  6. Hej! Skriver på svenska men jag har det annorlunda. Exempelvis så finns min butik Susan Cedgård Utvalt (Fb)i Varberg och jag har en blogg som visar hur jag ser på saker och vad som finns i mitt hem, du får bläddra bakåt i bloggen. Om du vill så är du välkommen till mig. Tack för din härliga blogg.

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  7. Hello. Thank you for the inspiring post, my love for wabi started with this blog! Can you please suggest what is the model of the red double-seat sofa on the second image and where could it be found? Thank you. Katerina

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    1. Hi Katerina! Thank you for your kind words. Unfortunately I do not know anything about the red sofa. Maybe if you get in touch with the architects ÁBATON (see link in blog)? They might know. Good luck!

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  8. This is a comment about the photograph of the room with the red sofa: I don't agree about the wabi sabi nature of the couch. This sofa is decrepit. Sabi objects carry the burden of their years with grace. Sabi is old and weathered, not something just retrieved from the dump. Would you sit on that couch? It looks dangerously unhygenic. The concept of wabi comes from Japanese tea ceremony, where cleanliness is a sign of respect. Wabi objects and wabi homes must be clean and in good repair. Having a wabi-sabi house doesn't mean you can let your cat scratch up your sofa, or neglect to clean up the coffee you spilled.

    Also, I hesitate to point out the freshly constructed Ikea bookshelf (without even a single book yet!) is not very sabi at all. Remember sabi is old-but-still functional, and wabi is making-do-with-less. This room may have a bit of wabi going for it; it certainly is simple. It is also fairly balanced, despite the slovenly couch.

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