Best way to stay trendy and warm this winter!


Winter is fast approaching in my part of the world, and I am preparing myself and my home for snow. To "help" me I have a nice selection of animal skins. I know they will keep me warm, cause they were all I had some years ago when we had a BIG storm and no electricity for days. I stayed in one room (the kitchen) where those furs (plus some candles and two cats) keep me nice and warm throughout the ordeal. (Now, a hot meal was a whole different matter...)


You may have noticed the trendy thing right now is to get a longhaired, Islandic sheep skin, like the ones above. Personally - I prefer the curly Gotland sheep skins seen in the pictures below.  

Last winter a friend gave me a reindeer skin from Lappland. While the sheep stay indoors, I bring the reindeer outdoor with me to sit on while watching a bonfire or just enjoying a hot cup of java in a sunny spot. 


 What kind of animal skin is YOUR favorite? If any? 
All images via my Pinterest
(Let me know if you have the source of these pics, and I'll add them asap. Thanks for your help.)
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9 comments:

  1. Summer is in full swing here on the east coast of Australia, and you have me craving a snowy winter!!

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  2. I would trade snowy winter for summer any time! :-D
    Cheers, Lisbeth

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  3. I love the simplicity of it all and the use of raw materials.....always a learning experience to visit your blog!~

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  4. I've been drawn to getting a sheepskin, but have been concerned about our cats and cat hair. Since you mentioned having skins and cats I should ask: is it difficult to keep them clean? Do cats lie on them and shed hair? Thanks! PS beautiful pics!

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    1. You are right, cats and sheepskins don't go well together. As long as I had my cats around I kept the skins away and only brought them out at special occasions. Not so much for their shedded hair, but because they treated the skins as their mother (so to speak) and I din't want them to "eat" to much hair.
      I had to put them down at the old age of 18 and 20 (!) and now I use the sheepskins around the house all the time. Good luck with your sheepskin. Cheers, Lisbeth

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  5. Your blog is one of my favorites, but this one takes me aback. Haven't we gotten past getting pleasure from killing & skinning animals? I suppose that if you are eating an animal & want to use it's skin as well, that could be okay. But I'm still uncomfortable with this idea.

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    1. Treah, Thank you for your input - I'm with you on this. The skins I'm showing here are all from animals, we (in Sweden) keep out in the wild, and when slaughtered for the meat, they make skins with the part that cannot me used any other way. I bought my sheep skins several years ago, when they were really, really cheap, because noone was interested in skins then. They use to get rid of (by burning) the skinsl then! I now love the fact they are popular and used instead of wasted.
      Now, if we talk about incarsirated animals in large scale food industries, I am not playing.

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    2. Many people in the world raise animals for food on their property or on small farms. It would be wasteful to throw these skins away, especially since using them means having to produce fewer synthetic products that don't last and end up in a landfill. And because they are more efficient at keeping you warm, you can use less energy to heat your home. Wholesale slaughter of animals just for their skins/pelts is abhorrent, and we should take care to source any furs/pelts appropriately. I try to purchase old/vintage pelts so I'm continuing to re-use instead of fueling demand for new things.

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